Human Centered Design - An Empathetic Process

Human-Centered Design, sometimes known as design thinking, can provide tools and processes that can help develop courageous and creative solutions to address the “wickedness” of poor health and well-being.

Design thinking is both a method and a mindset that we believe can bring value to the process of evolving more impactful approaches. It emphasizes strong empathy with the end user and the ability to see the world from multiple perspectives. It involves integrative thinking—striving to see all sides of a potential solution, optimism and confidence that workable solutions are possible in spite of the many challenges, and creativity and fearlessness to ask out-of-the-box, and even off-the-wall questions to general ideas (ideation). It involves the will and resilience to “iterate,” or to try out potential new solutions, learn quickly, throw out what doesn’t work and try something new. 
Collaborative and Empathetic Creative Process
We are in need of meaningful, engaging, and impactful innovations in the wellness and well-being field. We designed many of our solutions with the employer organization in mind, but the true end user of the “product” is the employee. 
Deep empathy with what employees want and need, is imperative for the design of our wellness and well-being approaches. 

Design thinking is a type of problem-solving that has been used for many years in the industrial design space and more recently, for attempting to solve some of our most “wicked” social problems. This includes hunger, poverty, and local, regional, and global environmental issues, among others. Design thinking can also provide tools and processes that can help develop courageous and creative solutions to address the “wickedness” of poor health and well-being.

​The process of design thinking involves employees directly in a highly collaborative team process. It can be both challenging and frustrating at times, but it is usually fun, and always exhilarating.

An enlightened approach to improving employee health and thriving must recognize health’s complex and multifaceted nature and the many different influences on health. We must ask ourselves what we can all do to make our organizations the most fertile ground possible for supporting and growing positive individual and positive organizational health
 
In the upcoming days and weeks, we will be updating this page with evidence, information, resources, and activities that can you understand how to incorporate design thinking into your efforts to evolve health into your environment, culture and climate.